Potty Training Seat

Transitioning From Toddler Potty to Adult Toilet

A potty training seat is the most convenient potty training aid in the world. There comes a time when children get the hang of using tike-size toilets and they’re ready to start using the household toilets. The problem is that frequently the size of the average adult seat is still a little too big, making children feel insecure. This can actually detract from potty training. This is the time to consider shopping for a potty seats.

Once my toddler was fairly well potty trained (at least around the house) I  was ready to switch from a toddler potty chair to a toilet trainer/ toddler seat for the toilet. Here are some tips and tricks I learned along the way.

First off, not all children are cut from the same cloth. Just because your friend’s child is using an adult toilet doesn’t mean your child is ready.

Many toddlers get attached to their potty chairs and resist the adult toilet. What’s a parent to do?

Eventually the time does come to move your child from his toddler potty onto the adult toilet. There is certainly convenience in having your toddler use an adult toilet - here are the STEPS to take for a smooth and happy transition.

  • Make sure the potty training seat you select is secure for the toilet so the child doesn’t slip or feel like they’re going to fall in (two things that will slow this process to a grinding halt).
  • You might want to invest in a new step stool or recycle one that you already have.
There are some great 3 in 1 products (like the Fisher-Price Ducky Fun 3-in-1 Potty ) that begin as toddler potties and then transform into a step stool + potty training seat. So the transfer to the bigger toilet might go almost unnoticed by your toddler.

Moving to a Potty Training Seat - How To Start

One really good tool for helping your child move from a potty training seat to the adult toilet is consistency.

  1. Move the toddler potty to the vicinity of the adult toilet (if it’s not already there).
  2. Figure out a routine for going potty and have a stash of activities (books and toys) to distract your toddler during the switch.
  3. Model using the toilet every chance you get, my toddler loves to help me flush and then reminds me to wash my hands. Some parents use training books or videos that support this process from the child’s vantage point. Others use a training doll as a visual aid.

It may be that your toddler will go in the training potty initially (after all that’s what they’re accustom to). When that happens, take (or better yet let your toddler take) empty the potty and flush the adult toilet. Let your child watch and explain that this is where big boys or girls go.

In time, and with you regularly demonstrating a use of the bathroom, understanding and success will come. There will be some misses but your toddler has not failed; they just have not succeeded yet. Take them gracefully and turn the moment into a positive learning experience, reminding your child to try and express their needs and/or get to the bathroom right away. Be patient and understanding. Eventually potty-training seats will disappear from your home (at least until you have another child!).

  • If your toddler is suspicious of the family toilet, let them sit on it with the lid down.
  • Keep your toddler company while he is on the adult toilet as a safety precaution, not to mention that your attendance and encouragement gives your child more confidence and security.

Encouragement and positive reinforcement are also part of this process. Let your toddler try the adult toilet whenever they have the urge to go. Training pants are a great help-mate to this process because they’re quick and easy. The faster and easier training pants come off equates to a greater chance of success, especially for children who haven’t got a lot of bladder control.

Return from potty training seat to Potty Seats

Leave a comment or share your story about kids potty training.

Return to Little Darling Potty Training home page

XML RSSSubscribe To This Site
  • XML RSS
  • follow us in feedly
  • Add to My Yahoo!
  • Add to My MSN
  • Subscribe with Bloglines